Posted by: Ken Brown | April 12, 2010

Almost There!

Thesis submitted!

The defense is next Monday at 10:30am 10:00am, in Alumni Hall, if anyone at or near Trinity Western is interested. My Supervisor and Second Reader seem to be pleased with the thesis and don’t expect any problems, but I’ll hold my celebration for another week.

By the way, whenever I see the expression “Almost there” I hear in my head that X-Wing pilot from Star Wars who makes the failed attack run on the Death Star. Here’s hoping I fair a little better!

Correction: The thesis defense will be at 10:00am, not 10:30.

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Responses

  1. Not that luck will be involved at all, but good luck. As one prof told me about my upcoming defense, “you probably know more about your topic than anyone else in the room.” I turn my final draft in Wednesday. No defense date has been set yet.

  2. Good luck to you as well, especially on finalizing the manuscript! Ugh. Glad to be done with THAT part.

  3. congratulations! now, hopefully your thesis does more than mine does, which is sit resolutely on a bookshelf in our family room. at least it gets dusted around every week or so by my daughter. heh. urm.

  4. LOL, what did you write it on?

  5. Congratulations! …Uh oh, there’s a TIE Fighter on your tail!

  6. the Boethian influences on the first fragment of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. doesn’t that just sound thrilling?! actually it was pretty thrilling to me at the time, and i also walked away from all the research with an image from the end of Boethius’ CONSOLATION OF PHILOSOPHY that allows me to wrap my head around how the whole predestination/free-will thing works (which is one of the reasons i can never see myself embracing Calvinism, no offense to any Calvinists out there), and i still use that image in discussions about that topic to this day. but, i just realized, i’d have a really hard time telling you right now exactly what the Boethian influences are on that first fragment. ack. i need to go back and read it again.

  7. I’ll get back to you when I figure out what you just said.

    Actually, I’m curious what this “image” is, that can answer all my questions about the tension between free will and determinism. Does that mean Boethius predicted how LOST would end? 😀

  8. I’m currently in Alberta and won’t be back on campus until the end of the month, but best of luck. You’ll do great!

  9. Boethius puts forth an image of God as trescending temporal, embracing “all the infinite recesses of past and future and views them in the immediacy of its knowing as though they are happening in the present.” So, he says, it is better to thinking of God as looking “forth at all things as though from a lofty peak above them.” To God, says Boethius, “the divine gaze looks down on all things without disturbing their nature; to Him they are present things, but under the condition of time they are future things.” (You can read the context of this at this link–scroll to the last prose section–but I don’t think the translation is as nice as the one I have by Watts: http://www.exclassics.com/consol/cons8.htm).

    Most suppose Boethius’ description of God as rather hands off (with good basis), but I see room for the much more personal biblical God. So, the image still works for me–God not simply outside temporal existence, but embracing it, moving through it all simultaneously, (to borrow Boethius’ image) his breath wafting through and mixing with our free-willed actions and existence in the temporal clouds surrounding his peak, past and future and present all at once. The future is not determined but still happening–does that make sense?

    It works for me. But as I’ve discovered in conversations with others, it definately doesn’t work for everyone, heh.


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